Taking Hardwood Cuttings Of Fruit Bushes

Gooseberry bush

If you grow fruit bushes such as currants or gooseberries then you can increase your stock by taking hardwood cuttings this month. Taking the cuttings is easy and in around a year, you will have some new little bushes to grow on in their permanent spots.

BlackcurrantTaking hardwood cuttings from gooseberries, red currants, white currants or black currants is easy. First, choose a healthy stem on one of your existing fruit bushes and cut it off at ground level. You can take a couple of stems from one healthy bush but it is best not to take any more or you could risk causing damage to your existing stock.


Next, reduce the length of that stem. Trim just below a bud at the bottom of the stem and just above a bud at the top to create a stick of around 25-30cm in length. Remove all the soft and green growth at the tip of the stem. With gooseberries, white currants and red currants you should also remove all but three or four buds at the top of the stem, though all the buds should be left on blackcurrant cuttings.


Choose a sunny and sheltered spot in which to nurture your cuttings. Make a vertical slot in the soil of around 10-15cm in depth. Sprinkle a little sand or grit in the base of the slot to aid in drainage and bury the cuttings so around half of each one is visible above the soil surface, firming in the soil around each one. The cuttings should be placed around 20cm apart.


The cuttings will be ready to transplant to their final growing positions in around a year. Since they will be in position for a full twelve months, you should of course choose the position for your cuttings wisely. Do not forget to water your cuttings during periods of dry weather. Other than keeping an eye on soil moisture, you should not have to do a lot before around this time next year.


Propagating plants through taking cuttings is an easy and affordable way to fill up your fruit garden. Take a little time now to ensure that you will be able to enjoy plenty of fruit in the years to come.

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